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Looped In

From urban renewal to suburban sprawl, Houston’s real estate market is going through one of its most dynamic times in decades. Join real estate and development reporter Nancy Sarnoff as she meets the city’s developers, deal makers and dreamers and dishes with colleagues on all things Houston real estate.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Apr 15, 2020

Nancy and Rebecca discuss their recent reporting on the challenges of buying and selling homes during the coronavirus pandemic. They're joined by appraiser Mike Taylor who explains how he values homes when he can’t go inside.

Apr 8, 2020

A chocolate maker famous for its truffles and toffees, is now making face guards meant to protect medical workers. It’s one of many companies around the state that has shifted to meet the demands created by the novel coronavirus. Michael Moss, owner of Sweet Shop USA, discusses how his business has mobilized to keep workers employed and contribute much-needed personal protective equipment during the crisis.

 

Apr 7, 2020

We hope you have found the series of Coronavirus Chronicle bonus episodes informative and entertaining. Follow the show on Apple Podcasts. Click subscribe — it's free — to receive fresh episodes daily. 

The Rev. Hannah Atkins Romero, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Midtown, talks about the sense of loss experienced by Houston’s faith communities as an Easter Sunday without church services approaches. Plus: a special performance by April Sloan-Hubert and the Trinity Jazz Ensemble.

Apr 7, 2020

The CEO of Landry’s has furloughed tens of thousands of employees. He’s closed hundreds of restaurant dining rooms and each of his Golden Nugget casinos. Nancy and Rebecca discuss the struggles of this larger-than-life Houston figure.

Apr 7, 2020

Today, we're sharing an episode of "Coronavirus Chronicle" with Looped In listeners. Previous episodes at available on Apple Podcasts.

Houston Chronicle photojournalist Marie De Jesús illuminates the balancing act between keeping a safe distance and capturing the intimate, human moments that reveal just how profoundly life in Houston has changed.

 

Apr 4, 2020

Today, we're sharing an episode of our new podcast "Coronavirus Chronicle" with Looped In listeners. You can listen to previous episodes here.

Houstonians know all about hurricanes: Wind speed, the dirty side, the European models. But what do we need to track the coronavirus? Angela Blanchard discusses that and more with the Houston Chronicle’s Lisa Gray.

Apr 2, 2020

Today, we're sharing a recent episode of "Coronavirus Chronicle" with Looped In listeners. Previous episodes are available here.

As March turned into April and the Houston stay-at-home order was extended to the start of May, renters who found themselves suddenly unemployed by the coronavirus outbreak have been left to wonder how they will pay for housing. Landlords have their own concerns: without the expected rent revenue, how will they be able to pay their own bills? Some states — including Texas — have temporarily stopped evictions from going forward in court. But what does that order really mean? Reporter Sarah Smith, who covers housing, homelessness and poverty for the Houston Chronicle, joins host Ferrill Gibbs to discuss the dilemma facing tenants and property owners alike.

Apr 1, 2020

Today, we're sharing a recent episode of "Coronavirus Chronicle" with Looped In listeners. Additional episodes are available here.

As Houston Chronicle executive editor Steve Riley said recently in a letter to readers: Quite suddenly, your lives have changed. Your health, or the health of someone you love, could be at risk. Your job seems shakier than just days ago. Your church isn’t having services, your favorite bar has closed, and the gym has locked its doors. And there’s no baseball, no March Madness. At the Houston Chronicle, we feel it, too. So as an introduction to our new daily podcast, host Ferrill Gibbs talks to Riley about the differences between the coronavirus crisis and other recent catastrophes, and about the unique challenge that covering it presents to local newsrooms.

Mar 19, 2020

Listen to the Houston Chronicle Editorial Board's impassioned plea to Houstonians coping with the coronavirus -- "Stay home!" -- as expressed by editorial board member Monica Rohr.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/coronavirus/

Mar 17, 2020
Mar 14, 2020

iBuyers are gaining market share, but are they making money? And John Daugherty has been a fixture in Houston’s high-end housing market. His real estate company is now in bankruptcy. Nancy and Rebecca explain.

Mar 7, 2020

Houston Chronicle retail reporter, Paul Takahashi, is moving on to cover the energy industry. But first, he is covering how the coronavirus is impacting retailers, from pharmacies to grocery stores. He also discusses the major trends he has seen in the retail industry, from experience-based shopping to what’s up with Houston malls.

Feb 19, 2020

The embrace of online shipping has driven a rush of warehouse space and logistics services. One Houston Chronicle employee ordered upwards of 800 packages in 2019 alone. But one link of the e-commerce supply chain remains in short supply: temperature-controlled warehouses, known as cold storage, necessary for storing and shipping groceries, meal prep kits, cold-pressed juice cleanses, dog stem cells — the list goes on.

Feb 7, 2020

Ding ding ding! The votes have been tallied and the winners are in! For Looped In's third-annual Loopie Awards for the best and worst of Houston real estate, the Chronicle's real estate editor reveals his picks for eight categories, including "Trendiest Development Trend," "Saddest Demise" and "Highest Gentrification Threat." The episode is part game show, part Rotten Tomatoes review. Listen along and congrats to all the winners!

Jan 31, 2020

The Houston Housing Authority’s new approach to affordable housing involves building complexes with units reserved for families of different incomes.

These new apartments aim to both attract those who can afford the rising costs of living and protect low-earners in danger of being pushed out of their longtime neighborhoods, while also providing space for people who earn something in between. However, not everyone is on board, especially as many fear affordable housing could strain their neighborhood’s infrastructure and discourage investment in the neighborhood.

Erin Douglas, who reports on the economy for the Houston Chronicle, joins real estate reporters R.A. Schuetz and Nancy Sarnoff to discuss mixed-use housing planned for the Fifth Ward, East End and Near Northside.

 

Jan 21, 2020

A new study from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University reveals how development and land use patterns have changed over time in neighborhoods near transit centers, park and ride lots and light rail stations. Kyle Shelton, the report's author, joins Nancy and Rebecca to talk about the benefits and the challenges of transit-oriented growth and the tools that could help prevent unintended consequences.

Jan 3, 2020

Everything's bigger in Texas. Even tiny homes. Texas is the top market in the nation for a type of tiny home known as a park model RV, and developers are building communities specifically for these dwellings outside of Houston.

Dec 10, 2019

Tony Buzbee, who's headed to a runoff Saturday in the 2019 race for Houston mayor, sat down with Nancy Sarnoff and Chronicle City Hall reporter Jasper Scherer to talk about his rise from small-town kid to millionaire lawyer and mayoral hopeful. This a one of two episodes featuring the candidates for mayor.

Dec 10, 2019

Mayor Sylvester Turner decided what he wanted his future to look like after watching the Kennedy/Nixon debate in 1960. That determination propelled him through school, where he graduated as valedictorian, all the way through Harvard Law, which was not his first choice. Turner sat down with Nancy Sarnoff and Chronicle City Hall reporter Jasper Scherer to reflect on his life in politics and the struggles he faced along the way. This is one of two episodes featuring the candidates for mayor.

Nov 20, 2019

NAR’s new policy on pocket listings is expected to result in a more transparent housing market, but there are loopholes, Nancy and Rebecca explain. They also talk about a recent luxury real estate event where agents learned about condo amenities for the ultra-rich.

Nov 14, 2019

For a long time, the phrase "man camp" evoked images of tents and mobile homes, but many have received a makeover. Large energy companies clamoring for safe housing — where their employees can get food and rest without any of the late-night carousing that can lead to trouble in the oil fields the next morning — has led companies like The Woodlands-based Target Hospitality to specialize in temporary housing. Perks include pools, basketball courts, fresh-squeezed orange juice and wood-fired pizzas.

 

 

Nov 6, 2019

Matt Zeve delivers a lot of bad news as deputy executive director of the Harris County Flood Control District. In the coming years, he'll be delivering a lot more. Potentially thousands of Harris County homeowners have fences, sheds and even swimming pools that encroach onto land the district owns or has the right to access. With the district now embarking on hundreds of flood mitigation projects, Zeve and his staff have started enforcing the encroachments. Nancy and Rebecca talk to Zeve about how the enforcement process works and what can happen when a property owner doesn’t comply.

Oct 25, 2019

After Harvey came the crisis investors, who bought hundreds of homes to flip. In places, they snapped up entire blocks. What do those communities look like two years later? Vacant and abandoned homes, as well as impromptu rentals, dot the landscape. Real estate agent Ace Tejada and home appraiser Mike Taylor take Looped In on a tour.

Read the story:

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Investors-promised-revival-after-Harvey-It-14473105.php

Oct 9, 2019

In Independence Heights, developers are tearing down the original bungalows and replacing them with skinny townhomes with six-foot fences. Whole Foods, often a harbinger of gentrification, has opened a store there. Like in other neighborhoods under a similar threat, there's been a growing movement toward preserving what's left -- even if it's just memories. The Chronicle's Sarah Smith joins Nancy and Rebecca to talk about her recent reporting on the community and what residents are doing to retain its historical character.

 

Sep 18, 2019

Late billionaire George Mitchell was a Galveston-born wildcatter who became widely known for being the father of the modern process of fracking. Yet as a young executive, Mitchell became fixated with the idea of creating a healthy, sustainable community at a time when many American cities were experiencing urban decay. Author and former Chronicle Business Columnist Loren Steffy explores Mitchell's paradoxical life in a new book titled “George P. Mitchell: Fracking, Sustainability and an Unorthodox Quest to Save the Planet.” He joins Nancy to talk about the legendary Houstonian.

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